New Program Seeks to Install New Field Turfs at Dozens of HBCUs

Willie Lanier, a former star of the National Football League’s Kansas City Chiefs and a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, has announced an initiative to install state-of-the-art playing surfaces at the football stadiums of nearly three-dozen historically Black colleges and universities. Partnering with FieldTurf, one of the world’s largest manufacturers and installers…

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Gun show suicide prevention chats get owners to lock guns up

Talking to people at gun shows about suicide prevention and the risks of unsecured firearms can lead to safe weapons storage, according to a new study. Researchers visited 18 gun shows and other community events around Washington state last year and found that engaging people in a community-based setting, in an empathetic conversation focused on…

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Clovis only made stone tools for about 300 years

The Clovis, some of North America’s earliest inhabitants, only made stone tools during a brief 300-year period from 13,050 to 12,750 years ago, new research shows. There is much debate surrounding the age of the Clovis—a prehistoric culture named for stone tools found near Clovis, New Mexico in the early 1930s—who once occupied North America…

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Conveyor Jam Detector For Industries

The conveyor jam detector circuit presented here is designed to activate an alarm device or programmable logic controller (PLC) when the speed of the conveyor system falls below the set minimum speed, alerting the workers the possibility of jamming of the conveyor system. Conveyor jam detector is an indispensable sensor device found in most conveyor…

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Imaging tech captures molecule ‘wobble’ in 3D

Researchers have found a way to visualize individual molecules inside living cells in greater detail, showing their position and orientation in 3D, and even how they wobble and oscillate. The work could shed invaluable insights into the biological processes involved, for example, when a cell and the proteins that regulate its functions react to the…

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Fake ‘grammar’ shows apes get language basics

Humans are not the only ones that can identify rules in complex language-like constructions—monkeys and great apes can, too, according to a new study. Researchers used a series of experiments based on an “artificial grammar” to conclude that this ability can be traced back to our ancient primate ancestors. “This suggests that this crucial element…

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Mask vs. muzzle: Even words are now polarized

In the United States, even the meanings of some words are now polarized, research finds. Everyone is speaking English, say the scientists, but computer analysis of social media discussions shows viewers of different news channels are, in a sense, speaking different languages. Based on millions of user comments on the YouTube channels for four leading…

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