Mosquito neurons for tasting blood ‘break the rules’

Researchers have pinpointed a unique group of neurons in female mosquitoes that activate only when sugar, salt, and other components of blood are all present at once. The human blood meal is a favorite recipe for female mosquitoes. They’re so drawn to its taste, they can’t help but bite—and in the process they spread diseases…

These neurons push female mosquitoes to taste blood

A unique group of neurons alerts female mosquitoes a meal is near, activating only when sugar, salt, and other components of blood are all present at once. The human blood meal is a favorite recipe for female mosquitoes. They are so drawn to its taste, they can’t help but bite—and in the process they spread…

Multiple droughts can be a mixed bag for forests

Successive droughts are generally increasingly detrimental to forests, even when each drought was no more extreme than the initial one, according to new research. Drought is endemic to the American West along with heatwaves and intense wildfires. But scientists are only beginning to understand how the effects of multiple droughts can compound to affect forests…

Ideas from others may prevent ‘fixation’ on your first solutions

When you’re in a rut in trying to creatively solve a problem, it may be a good idea to try ideas from others, new research suggests. When attempting to solve problems, people often fall back on prior experiences that worked, sometimes without considering other solutions. In other words, they stay in their comfort zone, which…

3 factors shed light on COVID-19 oxygen level mystery

Researchers have begun to solve one of COVID-19’s biggest and most life-threatening mysteries: how the virus causes “silent hypoxia,” a condition where oxygen levels in the body are abnormally low. Those low oxygen levels can can irreparably damage vital organs if gone undetected for too long. More than six months since COVID-19 began spreading in…